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      Song Dynasty (960 - 1279 AD)  
 
 

 

 

 
 

Song Dynasty wine jar with calligraphic inscription reading "gold", "horse", etc.

Measuring 20" high by 9" diameter.

 
         
       

 

 
 

An antique Chinese green glazed 'Yunnan' offering vessel with bas relief sculpting of lotus petals containing medallions of double headed vajra interspersed with palm fronds and a ring of twelve zodiac animals. This fascinating artifact is from an ancient region famous for its diverse interior cultures. Bordering on Tibet, India, Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam, this Chinese province also borders on three other contiguous Chinese provinces surrounding its northeast borders. It is home to 25 officially recognized minority cultures. The symbols exhibited on this vessel definitively point to the early influence of Buddhism in the region, including its form which resembles that of the Buddhist stupa - a religious monument of dome-shaped tumuli. This dome-form is often referred to as a "Receptacle of Relics" or a "Receptacle of Offerings". Many of the offerings found in these vessels included cowry shells, metal bracelets, fabric, glass beads, tortoise shell and paper with evidence of inscriptions. Song Dynasty, 12th/13th Century AD.

Measuring 14 ½" high by 11 ½" diameter.

 
         
       

 

 
 

A late Song to early Yuan Dynasty Chinese gray pottery sculpture of a court official on horseback. Characteristic of this period are these sturdy hand modeled horses that stand foursquare on a rectangular base. The face of the official, however, has a sophisticated presence that suggests an artist gifted in portraiture was responsible for this finishing touch. China, circa 1200 to 1300 AD.

Measuring 13" high by 10" wide by 5" deep.

 
         
       

 

      Yuan Dynasty (1271 - 1368 AD)  
       

 

 
 

An antique Chinese 'Yunnan' offering vessel with a beautiful deep emerald green glaze and bold bas relief sculpting of overlapping lotus petals. This fascinating artifact is from an ancient region famous for its diverse interior cultures. Bordering on Tibet, India, Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam, this Chinese province also borders on three other contiguous Chinese provinces surrounding its northeast borders. It is home to 25 officially recognized minority cultures. The lotus blossom is a symbol of the grace of the Buddha's dharma, as the lotus transcends the murky waters of life's existence. The form of this vessel points to the early influence of Buddhism in the region, including its resemblance to the Buddhist stupa - a religious monument of dome-shaped tumuli. This dome-form is often referred to as a "Receptacle of Relics" or a "Receptacle of Offerings". Many of the offerings found in these vessels included cowry shells, metal bracelets, fabric, glass beads, tortoise shell and paper with evidence of inscriptions. Yuan Dynasty.

Measuring 14 ¼" high by 10 ½" diameter.

 
         
       

 

      Late Yuan to Early Ming, circa 14th Century  
       

 

 
 

A compelling archaic artifact in the form of a large rectangular prayer stone from the Chinese province of Yunnan. The engraved calligraphic script is believed to be 'Devanagari', an obscure regional language of the region from the Yuan to early Ming periods. There are two spiritual deities, one male, one female, standing on moon discs with the Chinese character for Immortality (Eternal) engraved above them and prayers that surround them. Along the bottom is a repeated series of auspicious zodiac animals, the tiger, the dog and the dragon and again, the tiger, the dog and the dragon. Late Yuan to Early Ming, circa 14th Century.

Measuring approx. 24 ¼" high by 35 ¼" wide, including custom steel display bracket.

 
         
       

 

      Ming Dynasty (1368 - 1644 AD)  
       

 

 
 

A massive sculpted architectural tile depicting the sacred phoenix and peony blossom with a foliate leaf ground. The glaze is of a deep green and amber, both copper derivatives characteristically used in the Ming Dynasty.

Measuring 18" high by 29" wide.

 
       
       

 

 
 

An attractive Ming Dynasty ceramic ginger jar in a royal peacock blue glaze. This glaze is created by firing mineral sources of copper derivatives, such as turquoise, malachite, and lapis, giving it its rich variation of color. Accompanied by the original lid (it is common to see replacement lids in carved wood). Carved hongmu pedestal in stylized rolling cloud design. China, late 1500's. Ex: Benzabot Collection.

Measuring approximately 12 ½" high by 9" diameter (including fitted base).

 
         
     

 

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty high relief pair of three dimensional architectural panels with a charming and rather lyrical composition of geese and lotus blossoms. Such original architectural works of art were created on commission for the stately residences of Chinese aristocratic families. The green and mustard glazes are copper derivatives and are characteristic of the Ming Dynasty period. Most such marvelous friezes were systematically destroyed during the Cultural Revolution, however, some forward thinking aesthetes were able to smuggle such artifacts out of the country during this tumultuous time. China, circa late 1500's.

Measuring 12 ¾" high by 26 ½" wide & 12 ¾" high by 28 ½" wide, including custom frame.

 
         
       

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty glazed terracotta miniature model of a banquet table with miniature service of prepared food to represent a life of abundance and prosperity. The four column legs are cross bracketed and detailed with spandrels.

Measuring 7 ½” high by 12” wide by 8” deep.

 
       
       

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty glazed terracotta miniature model of the classic Chinese Kang, the raised leisure couch with cabriole legs that were traditionally part of the furnishings for the household of the ruling class. The long bench across the front of the Kang was used to comfortably ascend to its seating area. The green and mustard glazes are mineral pigments that are copper derivatives that were used in the decoration of Chinese sculpture from the Han through the Ming periods. 

Measuring 7” high by 13” wide by 8 ½” deep.

 
         
     

 

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty roof tile of a highly stylized rock dove with head turned to nestle within a fan of tail feathers. He stands upon the base of the curved architectural tile, a sculpture of delightful aesthetic appeal with deeply incised patterns to delineate the various feathers. The deep green and amber glazes are both copper derivatives characteristic of the Ming Dynasty. 

Measuring 19” high by 9 ½” wide by 5 ½” deep.