PREV --- ARCHAIC CERAMICS --- NEXT

 

      Song Dynasty (960 - 1279 AD)  
     

 

 

 
 

A rare archaic Song Dynasty wine jar of an elegant tall cocoon form with four ribbed loops at the neck from which a wooden stopper would be secured. The top half of the vessel is glazed in a deep beige upon which auspicious calligraphic inscriptions have been placed within double banded borders. Two of the prominent inscriptions reading “Gold” and “Horse”, both symbols of affluence in Song Dynasty China.

Measuring 20” high by 9” diameter.

 
         
       

 

 
 

An antique Chinese green glazed 'Yunnan' offering vessel with bas relief sculpting of lotus petals containing medallions of double headed vajra interspersed with palm fronds and a ring of twelve zodiac animals. This fascinating artifact is from an ancient region famous for its diverse interior cultures. Bordering on Tibet, India, Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam, this Chinese province also borders on three other contiguous Chinese provinces surrounding its northeast borders. It is home to 25 officially recognized minority cultures. The symbols exhibited on this vessel definitively point to the early influence of Buddhism in the region, including its form which resembles that of the Buddhist stupa - a religious monument of dome-shaped tumuli. This dome-form is often referred to as a "Receptacle of Relics" or a "Receptacle of Offerings". Many of the offerings found in these vessels included cowry shells, metal bracelets, fabric, glass beads, tortoise shell and paper with evidence of inscriptions. Song Dynasty, 12th/13th Century AD.

Measuring 14 ½" high by 11 ½" diameter.

 
         
       

 

      Yuan Dynasty (1271 - 1368 AD)  
       

 

 
 

An antique Chinese 'Yunnan' offering vessel with a beautiful deep emerald green glaze and bold bas relief sculpting of overlapping lotus petals. This fascinating artifact is from an ancient region famous for its diverse interior cultures. Bordering on Tibet, India, Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam, this Chinese province also borders on three other contiguous Chinese provinces surrounding its northeast borders. It is home to 25 officially recognized minority cultures. The lotus blossom is a symbol of the grace of the Buddha's dharma, as the lotus transcends the murky waters of life's existence. The form of this vessel points to the early influence of Buddhism in the region, including its resemblance to the Buddhist stupa - a religious monument of dome-shaped tumuli. This dome-form is often referred to as a "Receptacle of Relics" or a "Receptacle of Offerings". Many of the offerings found in these vessels included cowry shells, metal bracelets, fabric, glass beads, tortoise shell and paper with evidence of inscriptions. Yuan Dynasty.

Measuring 14 ¼" high by 10 ½" diameter.

 
         
       

 

 
 

A Yuan dynasty temple jar for the storage of wine. Created of cizhou-ware stoneware and finished in a characteristic straw glaze with underglaze black decoration. Two highly stylized and fantastic mythological Phoenixes with open wings surround the body of the jar. One wonders if the artist’s message was to proclaim supernatural results for consuming its contents.

Measuring 17” high by 15 ½” diameter, including base.

 
         
       

 

      Ming Dynasty (1368 - 1644 AD)  
       

 

 
 

A striking Ming dynasty sculpted architectural tile depicting the Sacred Phoenix and Peony Blossom. In Chinese legend, phoenix is known as “king of birds” while peony is “king of flowers”. The combination of phoenix and peony symbolizes prosperity, bright future and happiness. Traditionally the Chinese people would have commissioned such a panel of the artist for the interior courtyard wall at an entrance to their home. The contrasting glazes of amber and the deep green of the foliate ground are both copper derivatives characteristically used in the Ming Dynasty. 

Measuring 18" high by 29" wide.

 
       
       

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty roof tile of a highly stylized rock dove with head turned to nestle within a fan of tail feathers. He stands upon the base of the curved architectural tile, a sculpture of delightful aesthetic appeal with deeply incised patterns to delineate the various feathers. The deep green and amber glazes are both copper derivatives characteristic of the Ming Dynasty. 

Measuring 19” high by 9 ½” wide by 5 ½” deep.

 
       
       

 

 
 

An exceptionally rare pair of antique Chinese carved wood portrait figures of Ladies of the Imperial Court. There is a gentle animated presence to the countenance of each lady as she stands with dignity. Her intention is to serve, for she holds in each hand a Lingzhi, the sacred mushroom that conveys wellbeing to its recipients. Head dress, robes, and figures retain traces of original pigments of black, vermillion, green, and white slip, a pigmentation characteristic of Chinese archaic Ming-ch’i (tomb sculpture). Each figure is dressed in the royal attire most closely associated with the Tang dynasty (618-907), however, for sake of prudence we date these figures as Ming dynasty (1368-1644).

Measuring 24” high.

 
         
     

 

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty high relief pair of three dimensional architectural panels with a charming and rather lyrical composition of geese and lotus blossoms. Such original architectural works of art were created on commission for the stately residences of Chinese aristocratic families. The green and mustard glazes are copper derivatives and are characteristic of the Ming Dynasty period. Most such marvelous friezes were systematically destroyed during the Cultural Revolution, however, some forward thinking aesthetes were able to smuggle such artifacts out of the country during this tumultuous time. China, circa late 1500's.

Measuring 12 ¾" high by 26 ½" wide & 12 ¾" high by 28 ½" wide, including custom frame.

 
         
       

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty glazed terracotta miniature model of a banquet table with miniature service of prepared food to represent a life of abundance and prosperity. The four column legs are cross bracketed and detailed with spandrels.

Measuring 7 ½” high by 12” wide by 8” deep.

 
       
       

 

 
 

A Ming Dynasty glazed terracotta miniature model of the classic Chinese Kang, the raised leisure couch with cabriole legs that were traditionally part of the furnishings for the household of the ruling class. The long bench across the front of the Kang was used to comfortably ascend to its seating area. The green and mustard glazes are mineral pigments that are copper derivatives that were used in the decoration of Chinese sculpture from the Han through the Ming periods. 

Measuring 7” high by 13” wide by 8 ½” deep.